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Nappies

Number of wet nappies over 24 hours - 8 to 12
Number of dirty nappies over 24 hours - up to 12

In the first week, you probably won’t have much idea about how often you should be changing your baby’s nappy. As a guide, you could change him about every three hours – less often at night.

You’ll also be concerned about what’s a ‘normal’ nappy. If your baby has fewer than six wet nappies in 24 hours it can indicate dehydration, as can dark, yellow urine. Urine should be almost colourless, and nappies should be heavy. More than eight wet nappies a day show that your baby is getting plenty of fluid.

For the first few days, bowel movements are composed of meconium - sticky, thick, black-green stools with very little smell. This is made of digested mucus and collects in the bowel while your baby is in the womb.

As your baby takes milk, his bowel movements will gradually change to a brown-yellow colour and may become 'explosive'. This takes another few days.

If you're breast feeding then your baby's bowel movements will be light yellow and runny, looking much like French mustard. If you're bottle feeding they will be more solid and browner.

As the milk bowel movements become established, your baby may have a dirty nappy after every feed and you'll probably be changing a lot of nappies towards the end of the week. You can always peep in his leg-hole to see if he's dirty and needs changing, this can save getting him undressed.